Glossary of Linguistic Terms

Derivation

Derivation

Derivation is the formation of a new word or inflectable stem from another word or stem. It typically occurs by the addition of an affix.

The derived word is often of a different word class from the original. It may thus take the inflectional affixes of the new word class.

In contrast to inflection, derivation:

  • is not obligatory
  • typically produces a greater change of meaning from the original form, and
  • is more likely to result in a form which has a somewhat idiosyncratic meaning.
  • often changes the grammatical category of a root

(English)

Kindness is derived from kind.

Joyful is derived from joy.

Amazement is derived from amaze.

Speaker is derived from speak.

National is derived from nation.

Page/s: 25–26
Source: Payne, T. 1997a

Payne, Thomas E. (1997) .Describing morphosyntax: A guide for field linguists. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press.

Page/s: 342
Source: Mish 1991

Mish, Frederick (editor). 1991.Webster's ninth new collegiate dictionary. Springfield, MA: Merriam-Webster. 1,564 pages. 0877795088; indexed 0877795096; deluxe 087779510X.

Page/s: 62
Source: Hartmann and Stork 1972

Hartmann, R.R.K., and F.C. Stork. 1972.Dictionary of language and linguistics. London: Applied Science.

Page/s: 89
Source: Crystal 1985

Crystal, David. 1985.A dictionary of linguistics and phonetics. 2nd edition. New York: Basil Blackwell.

Page/s: 81–82, 99
Source: Bybee 1985

Bybee, Joan L. 1985.Morphology: A study of the relation between meaning and form. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Broader Terms

More specific terms

Related terms

Date of creation
05-Ago-2021
Accepted term
05-Ago-2021
Descendant terms
1
ARK
ark:/99152/t3zvq4le0wo97m
More specific terms
1
Alternative terms
0
Related terms
10
Notes
8
Metadata
Search
  • Search Derivation  (Wikipedia)
  • Search Derivation  (Google búsqueda exacta)
  • Search Derivation  (Google scholar)
  • Search Derivation  (Google images)
  • Search Derivation  (Google books)